Classic Book Reviews

This is a compilation of all of the Classic Books I will be reading this Summer/Autumn. I have already written a review of Frankenstein so that is not pictured above.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (1884)

This is one of the great American novels and has themes of race and identity. The author Mark Twain seemed critical of the racism that existed at the time of the books publishing. It is written from the perspective of a boy named Huckleberry Finn as he goes on lots of adventures in his youth.

Hard Times by Charles Dickens (1854)

This is the 10th novel of Charles Dickens. I am looking forward to reading Hard Times because Charles Dickens books sometimes had critical views of the social and economic conditions in 19th century England.

Dracula by Bram Stoker (1897)

A gothic horror by the Irish author Bram Stoker. He created ‘Count Dracula’ in a story of vampirism and horror fiction. Many books on vampires have been successful since, for example, Twilight based on the vampire myth. This was a landmark vampire novel and I am excited to read it.

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen (1813)

This  is a romance novel and is a popular novel in English literature. I do not read many romance novels but I find Pride and Prejudice to be appealing.

Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë (1847)

Emily Brontë was part of the Brontë family and Wuthering Heights was her only novel. This book is a classic in English literature and is part of the period of Romanticism in Europe.

Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert (1856)

This was the debut novel of French author Gustave Flaubert and he began the artistic movement of literary realism in France. It depicts ordinary circumstances as they are.

The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne (1850)

This is another American classic that is set in the puritan era in 17th century Massachusetts. This is also considered a romance novel and revolves around legalism and sin.

Gullivers’ Travels by Jonathan Swift (1726)

This is the oldest of the novels I have compiled so far and it is a satire on human nature. This one is also by an Irish author.

One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Marquez (1967)

This is a modern classic by a Colombian author and is a multi-generational story with a magic realist style. I hope to read more literature from other ethnic authors as part of the next collection of classic books I review.

Review of Everything, Everything 

*No spoilers*

Everything, Everything was the first book written by Nicola Yoon before The Sun Is Also a Star.

Image: Moviefone (2018)

I enjoyed the book very much and read it within a few days as I was busy but found time to read around an hour a day this week. The story had similar themes such as love, exploration and family. 

It had illustrations by the authors husband David Yoon, which were nice because it has been a long time since I read a book with illustrations. I initially thought there were just lots of chapters, but the headings on the pages became more and more frequent. I also liked that the main character Madeline was widely read and had book spoilers to help support what she was saying. 

These were some very memorable quotes that I particularly enjoyed: 

“Life is a gift. Don’t forget to live it”

“A butterfly flaps its wings now and a hurricane forms in the future”

“Me in love would be like being a food critic with no taste buds. It would be like being a colour-blind painter”

“Love is worth everything. Everything”

This book has an interesting perspective on family and it centres around Madeline, the protagonist, who turns 18 at the beginning. As she suffers from SCID she is not allowed to leave the house at all and essentially lives in a bubble.

This book also features an interracial relationship and this is mentioned in the story. Moreover,to a film is now being released of the book fairly soon. I read the version with pictures from the film and the mother character is described as a 3rd generation Japanese woman while Madeline’s father is African-American, however the film has a black woman acting as the mother. I have not yet seen the film so I am not sure whether the father portrayed as Asian but the film has cast Amandla Stenberg as the Madeline, who is not of Asian descent.

Personally I don’t think that this change matters to the actual story as the father character is just background he is not in the book, he is deceased along with Maddy’s brother.

There was an insight into different family issues such as Domestic violence and it’s effects. However, nothing particularly graphic occurs in the book.

Above all, it was a moving love story between the two characters Olly and Maddy, with references to Chaos theory, the Butterfly effect and the idea of Change.

Other reviews:

Book Review of Everything, Everything

Everything, Everything Review | The Guardian

Film Review of Everything, Everything: the motion picture

Everything, Everything film review by Variety 
The film trailer and background

Film Trailer on nicolayoon.com

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley Review

I enjoyed reading Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley, as I found it thought provoking. This is one of the first classic books I’ve written about and I’m glad I started with Frankenstein.

Image: Michelle Rodelo via Flickr (2018)

It is a common misunderstanding that the ‘creature’ created in the story is named Frankenstein, however the scientist who created him is actually named Frankenstein. A large part of the book is his flashback. His creation is never given an actual name.

The characters were developed well and they were gradually phased out from the story, so towards the end most of the focus is on the monster and his experience of life and feeling rejected by humans.

“How much happier that man is who believes his native town to be the world, than he who aspires to be greater than nature will allow” – Frankenstein

Personally, I feel that the reader is dissuaded from feeling any sympathy for Frankenstein or the monster, but is encouraged to see God’s creation of humans as superior to humans creations.